Non-Toxic Dental Composite Fillings & Materials by Dr. Yuriy May

Typically, most dentists use materials in dentistry approved by the FDA and generally considered safe for use. However, regular dentists rarely explore biocompatibility of materials with each individual person. Don’t be surprised if a traditional dentist that you speak to has no idea what the chemical or molecular consistency is of dental materials, whether dental composites for fillings or anesthetics.

Dental Composites – Potential Toxicity

While most dentists are using either the cheapest dental composites (as most patients don’t know the difference) and the more cosmetic and quality focused dentists are using the strongest and most durable composites, few of them, if any, actually know the potentially hazardous chemicals in dental composite materials used for bonding and filling carries.

Dr. May has done years of research on Dental Materials Chemical Properties and Bio-Chemistry of Dental Material Compounds making him an expert in the field of dental material biocompatibility and the leading dentist specialist for the safest dental materials available on the market. Most dental composites are composed of methacrylate resin monomers made of of various size and molecular weight.

Concern with onventional methacrylate monomers in Regular Dental Composite Material

Regular dental composite materials used to fill caries are composed of conventional methacrylate monomers, which are BPA, Bis-GMA, TEGDMA, GlyDMA and HEMA. These methacrylate monomers have the ability to release vapor (leaching) of the BPA and Bis-GMA unreacted, freely available monomers. This effect is later reduces once the fillings are light cured but not eliminated which means that all the conventional methacrylate monomers like BPA and Bis-GMA can continue to leach for the duration of the composite being in the patients’ mouth. Light curing is the process by which a dentist transforms the composite fillings from a liquid to a solid state.

Biocompatible Dental Fillings Used by Dr. Yuriy May

For low-toxicity dental fillings and dental cosmetic bonding, Dr. May exclusively uses Admira Fusion Ormocer which is a Nano-Hybrid Ormocer (ORganically-MOdified CERamic). This ceramic material is no longer a methacrylate based composite but instead is closer to a ceramic or silica based (think glass) material. Importantly, it DOES NOT contain conventional monomers such as Bis-GMA, TEGDMA, GlyDMA and HEMA

Testing Indicating that Dr. May’s Dental Composite has no traces of Conventional Methacrylate Monomers

Samples were then taken from Admira Fusion and other conventional composite materials to test for the various chemical properties. For each composite, the resin matrix broken down into the individual components by means of gas chromatography (“GC”) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC).
The gas chromatography spectrum clearly shows that no methacrylate monomers with a low molecular weight are used in uncured Admira Fusion. In addition, the claim that no conventional methacrylate monomers are used is confirmed yet again by the analysis of the already cured Admira Fusion test specimen. Conventional monomers such as BPA, Bis-GMA, TEGDMA, GlyDMA and HEMA can be detected with this measuring method, as is the case in the comparative spectrum of the conventional composites available on the market and used in the study. In the case of traditional dental composite materials, conventional methacrylate monomers are detected in both the uncured and the cured specimens of the composite. While the curing of the composite lowers the concentration of unreacted, freely available monomers significantly, conventional dental composites still retain monomers such as BPA and Bis-GMA, GlyDMA,and HEMA, even in their cured states.